Thursday, March 15, 2012

exploring chinese courtship in the "Joy Luck Club"

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Exploring Chinese Courtship in The Joy Luck Club


Through reading Amy Tan’s, The Joy Luck Club, it is evident that the Chinese people


have extraordinarily specific courtship rituals that must be followed, this idea is further


developed when the reader learns about one of the mothers in the story, Lindo Jong, who is


Write my Essay on exploring chinese courtship in the "Joy Luck Club" for me

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courted at a young age and forced to marry a awfully spoiled young man named Tyuan-Yu. In


the story, Lindo undergoes all the conventional courtship traditions that took place in China


before a wedding could come to pass.


In the story, the old village matchmaker and Huang Taitai seek Lindo out as a possible


bride for Taitai’s son, Tyan-yu, even though the two were still young at the time, Lindo being


two and Tyan-yu only one, the matchmaker insisted that “[it would be] the best marriage


combination” (Tan 44). Because both families are from a small village, Haung Taitai has the


matchmaker to find Tyan-yu’s bride, but by this time, “in other cities […] a man could choose


his own wife, with his parents’ permission” (Tan 45), but the mothers of this village,


Taiyuan, began to fear this new way of thinking when they “were told stories of sons who were


so influenced by bad wives that they threw their old, crying parents out into the street” (Tan 45).


The main idea when searching for a potential wife for a son was to find a young girl who would


eventually serve her aging mother and father-in-law and new husband, “take care of


household finances, and most of all give birth to sons to inherit the wealth of the family”


(Chinese Courtship and Weddings). The idea that women were only good to do tasks of this


sort was a common way of thinking at this time, but now, in most places throughout the world,


women have gained a lot more respect and have managed to raise their status a significant


amount as opposed to times when they couldn’t even chose their own husband. After the


potential bride is found “the matchmaker will ask for the girls birthday and birth hour record to


assure the compatibility of the potential bride and bridegroom” (Costa) “after three days, if


Collazos


nothing disastrous [happens] in the family, such as an illness or a broken vase or dish, the match


[would be] approved” (Chinese Wedding Customs). The majority of parents who’s children


were having an arranged marriage were often unbelievably superstitious, but the fact that they


believed so strongly that birthday matching would be good for their children in the long run


demonstrates that they care enough to go through all the trouble to hire the matchmaker and


assure themselves that their children would live a long, life with lots of luck. In The Joy Luck


Club, Haung Taitai is reluctant to choose two-year-old Lindo as Tyan-Yu’s feature bride when


she notices she “has a bad pichi, a bad temper” (Tan 44) that may someday effect her son’s


happiness, with this in mind, “the only reason parents were so careful about their child’s feature


spouse was they cared about [their] happiness” (Lee).


Once the matchmaker has found that “the couple’s birthday and birth hour do not


conflict according to astrology, the marriage will step into the next stage” (Warrior Tours)


meaning that “twelve gifts [would] be exchanged between the two families” (Costa) along with


a letter of betrothal from that groom’s family to the bride’s family (Warrior Tours). The


betrothal letter was sent to the brides family along with the gifts this letter was considered “ a


formal document of the engagement” (Warrior Tours). The gifts were also important to the


Chinese people because they often symbolized things that would bring lots of luck to both


families and the engagement of the two children (Costa). As their gift to the Haungs, Lindo’s


family gives up “all the heavy bedding and furniture that [they had to] leave behind” (Tan 47)


this gift would be “enough, more then enough,” (Tan 47) for the Haungs to take Lindo into their


home. Traditionally it is the groom’s family that gives the brides family the majority of the


gifts (The Heart of the Dragon Episode 8 Marrying), especially gifts akin to furniture and other


items for the home, usually the Chinese tradition calls for the men in the groom’s family carry


the gifts, which was usually furniture, to the brides family, therefore it seems quite unusual that


Collazos


Lindo’s family would give the Haungs such a surprisingly extravagant donation.


In the end, Lindo’s identity is formed by things that were culturally expected from her.


When she Marries Tuan-Yu she puts her responsibilities to her family above her own desires


which proves her respect for her family, but most of all, respect towards her own mother, who


always told Lindo that if the Haungs decide not to take her the “whole family would be


disgraced” (Tan 45). Traditionally, after all the courtship rituals have been preformed; the


matchmaker, the birthday matching, the gifts and betrothal letter, an astrologist or astronomy


book [would be] consulted to select an auspicious date to hold the wedding ceremony” (Warrior


Tours) and the wedding would take place.


Exploring Chinese Courtship in The Joy Luck Club


Through reading Amy Tan’s, The Joy Luck Club, it is evident that the Chinese people


have extraordinarily specific courtship rituals that must be followed, this idea is further


developed when the reader learns about one of the mothers in the story, Lindo Jong, who is


courted at a young age and forced to marry a awfully spoiled young man named Tyuan-Yu. In


the story, Lindo undergoes all the conventional courtship traditions that took place in China


before a wedding could come to pass.


In the story, the old village matchmaker and Huang Taitai seek Lindo out as a possible


bride for Taitai’s son, Tyan-yu, even though the two were still young at the time, Lindo being


two and Tyan-yu only one, the matchmaker insisted that “[it would be] the best marriage


combination” (Tan 44). Because both families are from a small village, Haung Taitai has the


matchmaker to find Tyan-yu’s bride, but by this time, “in other cities […] a man could choose


his own wife, with his parents’ permission” (Tan 45), but the mothers of this village,


Taiyuan, began to fear this new way of thinking when they “were told stories of sons who were


so influenced by bad wives that they threw their old, crying parents out into the street” (Tan 45).


The main idea when searching for a potential wife for a son was to find a young girl who would


eventually serve her aging mother and father-in-law and new husband, “take care of


household finances, and most of all give birth to sons to inherit the wealth of the family”


(Chinese Courtship and Weddings). The idea that women were only good to do tasks of this


sort was a common way of thinking at this time, but now, in most places throughout the world,


women have gained a lot more respect and have managed to raise their status a significant


amount as opposed to times when they couldn’t even chose their own husband. After the


potential bride is found “the matchmaker will ask for the girls birthday and birth hour record to


assure the compatibility of the potential bride and bridegroom” (Costa) “after three days, if


Collazos


nothing disastrous [happens] in the family, such as an illness or a broken vase or dish, the match


[would be] approved” (Chinese Wedding Customs). The majority of parents who’s children


were having an arranged marriage were often unbelievably superstitious, but the fact that they


believed so strongly that birthday matching would be good for their children in the long run


demonstrates that they care enough to go through all the trouble to hire the matchmaker and


assure themselves that their children would live a long, life with lots of luck. In The Joy Luck


Club, Haung Taitai is reluctant to choose two-year-old Lindo as Tyan-Yu’s feature bride when


she notices she “has a bad pichi, a bad temper” (Tan 44) that may someday effect her son’s


happiness, with this in mind, “the only reason parents were so careful about their child’s feature


spouse was they cared about [their] happiness” (Lee).


Once the matchmaker has found that “the couple’s birthday and birth hour do not


conflict according to astrology, the marriage will step into the next stage” (Warrior Tours)


meaning that “twelve gifts [would] be exchanged between the two families” (Costa) along with


a letter of betrothal from that groom’s family to the bride’s family (Warrior Tours). The


betrothal letter was sent to the brides family along with the gifts this letter was considered “ a


formal document of the engagement” (Warrior Tours). The gifts were also important to the


Chinese people because they often symbolized things that would bring lots of luck to both


families and the engagement of the two children (Costa). As their gift to the Haungs, Lindo’s


family gives up “all the heavy bedding and furniture that [they had to] leave behind” (Tan 47)


this gift would be “enough, more then enough,” (Tan 47) for the Haungs to take Lindo into their


home. Traditionally it is the groom’s family that gives the brides family the majority of the


gifts (The Heart of the Dragon Episode 8 Marrying), especially gifts akin to furniture and other


items for the home, usually the Chinese tradition calls for the men in the groom’s family carry


the gifts, which was usually furniture, to the brides family, therefore it seems quite unusual that


Collazos


Lindo’s family would give the Haungs such a surprisingly extravagant donation.


In the end, Lindo’s identity is formed by things that were culturally expected from her.


When she Marries Tuan-Yu she puts her responsibilities to her family above her own desires


which proves her respect for her family, but most of all, respect towards her own mother, who


always told Lindo that if the Haungs decide not to take her the “whole family would be


disgraced” (Tan 45). Traditionally, after all the courtship rituals have been preformed; the


matchmaker, the birthday matching, the gifts and betrothal letter, an astrologist or astronomy


book [would be] consulted to select an auspicious date to hold the wedding ceremony” (Warrior


Tours) and the wedding would take place.





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